Keep Your Tomato Plants Disease Free

Tomato plants' diseases are a problem for all gardeners, even those old pros who have been growing tomatoes for years. Fungi and bacteria can cause disease in easy grown tomato plants. The good news about these problems is that you can prevent and easily cure them. It is easiest to minimize plant distress by early detection. Good gardeners must always keep a close watch on their garden to monitor that their plants are healthy and thriving. As soon as any problem is spotted, the issue needs to be dealt with as soon as possible to keep the disease contained and to lessen plant suffering.

It is always a good idea to stay a step ahead of tomato disease while planting your garden. Choosing the type of tomato to plant is the first step in disease prevention. Hybrids are a good option because many are specially bred to be resistant to certain diseases. It is a good idea to be aware of common diseases in your area and then choose a plant that is resistant to that sickness. The bad news is that many heirlooms are vulnerable to disease, therefore a variety of tomato types should be planted, just in case disease strikes. Always remember that varying the types of plants in your garden will help keep diseases at bay, and you will be able to enjoy an assortment of flavors all summer long!

Get your tomato growing guide now!Keeping your plants healthy is not just about planting healthy plants, but also providing them with a nourishing physical environment. Moist climates are more predisposed to fungal disease, so it is very important to be methodical in the way you water your tomato garden. It is important to make sure you don't saturate the leaves of the plants when watering, just moisten the soil. Watering in the earlier hours of the day will help the absorption into the soil, and the warm daytime sun will evaporate any moisture that may have gotten on the leaves of the plants.

One of the more common diseases in tomato plants is early blight. It is a fungal disease that can be identified by dark splotches and "target-like" rings on the leaves. Early blight is more often identified in humid climes, specifically where it gets hot during the day. If you are unfortunate enough to find early blight in your garden, you must remove and destroy the affected plants and their roots. It is a good idea to refrain from planting tomatoes in that spot next year and find a veggie that is resistant to this fungus.

The next fungal tomato plant disease I'd like to mention is late blight, which can be identified by dark, water- soaked lesions on the plants, which spread and kill the plant. Humid climates with cool evenings are prime areas for late blight to appear. You may also notice an oily, damp residue on your tomatoes themselves, which is also an indication of this fungus.

Unhealthy tomato plants, diseases, and fungal infections are all preventable if you know what to look for and frequently inspect your garden for signs of these problems. Proper watering and soil care are also a big factor in preventing problems in your garden. Remember to water the soil only, make sure your plants are spaced enough to get air between them, and keep you soil mulched. In addition to planting disease resistant varieties of tomato, these tips should help keep your tomato plants disease free.

Mike Mazzaro has written extensively on tomato gardening. For more information on avoiding common tomato plants' diseases, visit www.TomatoGardeningSecrets.com.

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Last modified on Friday, 27 March 2015 15:02
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